Anne's
Talks

    2022

  1. Monitoring Molecules in Neuroscience Biennial Meeting, Lyon, France (June 29-July 2, 2022).
  2. International Society for Serotonin Research Biennial Meeting (April 24-28, 2022).
  3. High-resolution electronic neurotransmitter monitoring in vivo. Neuroelectronic Interface Gordon Research Conference, Ventura, CA (March 13-18, 2022).
  4. 2021

  5. Implantable aptamer-FET neuroprobes for in vivo neurotransmitter sensing, PacifiChem, Honolulu, HI (December 16-21, 2021, virtual).
  6. American College of Neuropsychopharmcology Annual Meeting, San Juan, Puerto Rico (December 5-8, 2021).
  7. Vanderbilt Brain Institute 2020 Retreat keynote speaker, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (September 30, 2021).
  8. Conover Endowed Lecture for Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (September 27, 2021).
  9. YUCOMAT 2021 Plenary Lecture, 22nd Conference of the Materials Research Society of Serbia, Herceg Novi, Montenegro (August 30-September 3, 2021).
  10. Electronic, multiplexed neurochemical monitoring. Plenary lecture, 95th ACS Colloid and Surface Science Symposium (June 15, 2021, virtual).
  11. Electronic and Electrochemical Sensors for in vivo Neurochemical Monitoring. Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside, (May 20, 2021, virtual).
  12. Advances in Neurochemical Monitoring. Symposium on Neurotechnology, University of California, Los Angeles, (May 10, 2021, virtual).
  13. Electronic, multiplexed neurochemical monitoring. Award Symposium in Surface Chemistry in honor of Teri Odom, 2021 ACS National Meeting (April 13, 2021, virtual).
  14. Advancing in vivo Neurotransmitter Monitoring. Interdepartmental Program in Neuroscience Seminar Series, University of Cincinnati (April 8, 2021, virtual). 
  15. Adventures in Neuroscience and Nanotechnology. National Science Day Celebration, Department of Chemistry, Uka Tarsadia University, Bardoli, India (February 28, 2021, virtual).
  16. 2020

  17. Eavesdropping on chemical communication. iCANX, Global Online Science Talk, Beijing, China (November 20, 2020).
  18. Nanoribbon aptamer-field-effect transistors for biosensing. Plenary lecture, IEEE International Conference on Nanomaterials: Applications & Properties, Sumy State University, Sumy, Ukraine (November 9, 2020, virtual).
  19. Eavesdropping on chemical communication. Minority Opportunities in Research Programs, California State University, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (October 30, 2020, virtual).
  20. Advancing aptamer-FET sensors for implantable and wearable applications. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (September 29, 2020, virtual).
  21. Eavesdropping on chemical neurotransmission. Center for Addiction Research, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, TX (July 17, 2020, virtual).
  22. Biologically germane sensing with aptamer-field-effect sensors. Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (February 19, 2020).
  23. Biologically germane sensing with aptamer-field-effect sensors. Undergraduate Science Journal, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (February 12, 2020).
  24. 2019

  25. Biologically germane sensing with aptamer-field-effect sensors. Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (November 7, 2019).
  26. Biologically germane sensing with aptamer-field-effect sensors. NaNaX 9: Nanoscience with Nanocrystals, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany (September 18, 2019).
  27. Nanoengineered materials and devices to detect DNA hybridization and single nucleotide polymorphisms. Nanotechnology and Single Cell Analysis in Biology and Medicine Symposium. 258th ACS National Meeting, San Diego, CA (August 26, 2019).
  28. Confined defects formed by chemical lift-off lithography to pattern multi-functional substrates. Structure at Solid-Liquid Interfaces: Effects of Confinement and Chemical Patterning Symposium. 258th ACS National Meeting, San Diego, CA (August 26, 2019).
  29. Eavesdropping on neurochemical signaling in vivo. Wearable & Implantable Sensors Symposium. 258th ACS National Meeting, San Diego, CA (August 25, 2019).
  30. Biologically germane sensing with aptamer-field-effect sensors. MiBio Summit on Flexible and Stretchable Biosensors, Department of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (July 29, 2019).
  31. Aptamer-field-effect transistor neuroprobes: Towards multimodal sensing. 7th Micro- and Nanotechnologies for Medicine Workshop, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (July 12, 2019).
  32. Eavesdropping on neurochemical signaling in vivo. Department of Chemistry, American University, Washington, DC (June 4, 2019).
  33. Chemical and electronic eavesdropping on brain neurotransmission. 37th Biennial Meeting of the Spanish Royal Society of Chemistry, San Sebastian, Spain (May 29, 2019).
  34. Nanotechnology meets neuroscience and medicine. Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Canada (May 1, 2019) public lecture, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PfXHf64LUU8 .
  35. Aptamer-field-effect transistor microprobes for in vivo neurotransmitter detection. Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy, Philadelphia, PA (March 18, 2019).
  36. Eavesdropping on neural communication. Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA (March 6, 2019).
  37. Eavesdropping on neural communication. Wearable Tech+Digital Health+Neurotech Conference. Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (February 21, 2019).
  38. 2018

  39. Functional biomaterials and biosensors. Expanding Frontiers in Chemical Sciences: American Chemical Society and Indian Academy of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Uttar Pradesh, India (November 1, 2018).
  40. Functional biomaterials and biosensors. Indian Institute of Technology, New Dehli, India (October 30, 2018).
  41. Functional biomaterials and biosensors. 14th International Conference on Atomically Controlled Surfaces, Interfaces and Nanostructures (ACSIN14), Sendai, Japan (October 24, 2018).
  42. Electronic neurotransmitter sensing. Cell Press—NERF: Neurotechnologies, KU Leuven, Belgium (September 30-October 1, 2018).
  43. Aptamer-field-effect transistor biosensors. International Conference on Nanotechnologies and Biosciences, Heraklion, Crete (September 24-28, 2018).
  44. Field-effect transistor biosensors. Micro- and Nanotechnologies for Medicine: Emerging Frontiers and Applications, California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (July 20, 2018).
  45. Serotonin transporter function and anxiety-related behavior. Genetic, Physiologic, and Therapeutic Perspectives on Transporters in the Nervous System, International Society for Neurochemistry Satellite Meeting, Maintenon, France (August 26, 2017).
  46. International Society for Serotonin Research, Cork, Ireland (July 15-19, 2018).
  47. Multiplexed serotonin and dopamine monitoring: Why faster is better v2.0. Monitoring Molecules in Neuroscience: 17th International Conference, Oxford, UK (March 25-29, 2018).
  48. Neurotransmitter sensing via aptamer-field-effect transistors. Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy, Orlando, FL (February 26-March 1, 2018).
  49. Rapid pulse voltammetry for selective neurotransmitter sensing. Ralph N. Adams Symposium Award, Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy, Orlando, FL (February 26-March 1, 2018).
  50. Neurotransmitter sensing via aptamer-field-effect transistors. Atlantic Basin Conference on Chemistry, Cancun, Mexico (January 23-26, 2018).
  51. 2017

  52. 9th International Conference of the Africa Materials Research Society Meeting, Gaborone, Botswana(December 11-14, 2017).
  53. Genetic, Physiologic, and Therapeutic Perspectives on Transporters in the Nervous System, International Society for Neurochemistry Satellite Meeting, Maintenon, France (August 25-29, 2017).
  54. International Conference on Chemical Bonding, Kauai, HI (June 22-26, 2017).
  55. University of California, Davis, Davis, CA (April 6, 2017).
  56. Aptamer field-effect transistors as neurochemical sensors to monitor neurotransmitters in vivo. 253rd National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, San Francisco, CA (April 2, 2017).
  57. Self-assembly in confined spaces: Using defects to advantage. 253rd National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, San Francisco, CA (April 2, 2017).
  58. The brain is more than a computer. ACS Board Meeting, 253rd National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, San Francisco, CA (April 2, 2017).
  59. One Chemistry Symposium, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (March 26-29, 2017).
  60. 5-HT1A autoreceptor control of serotonin signaling—Rethinking modes of inhibitory feedback. Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy,, Chicago, IL (March 8, 2017).
  61. Functional nanomaterials and chemical neurotransmission. Gordon Research Conference on GPCRs,, Lucca, Italy (March 13, 2017).
  62. 2016

  63. Functional nanomaterials and chemical neurotransmission. Self-Assembly in Confined Spaces Workshop, CIC biomaGUNE, San Sebastian, Spain (October 27, 2016).
  64. Grand challenges in understanding the brain: Integrating models, technologies, and scale. Measuring the Brain, National Science Foundation Workshop, Arlington, VA (October 12, 2016).
  65. In vivo electronic neurotransmitter sensing. Kavli Symposium on Chemical Neurotransmission: What Are We Thinking? 252th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Philadelphia, PA (August 22, 2016).
  66. How can we know who will benefit from SSRIs? International Society for Serotonin Research Meeting, Seattle, WA (July 25, 2016).
  67. Chemical neurotransmission and functional nanomaterials. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (June 14, 2016).
  68. The future of monitoring serotonin in vivo. Plenary lecture for Monitoring Molecules in Neuroscience: 16th International Conference, Gothenburg, Sweden (May 29-June 2, 2016).
  69. The future of monitoring serotonin in vivo. Center for Mind, Brain and Computation, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (May 9, 2016).
  70. The future of monitoring serotonin in vivo. Plenary Lecture for the Neuroengineering Workshop, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada (May 5, 2016)
  71. UCLA Neuroscience Integrative Center on Addiction, University of California, Los Angeles (April 7, 2016).
  72. Chemical neurotransmission and functional nanomaterials. NaNaX 7, Philipps University , Marburg, Germany (April 8, 2016).
  73. Chemical neurotransmission and functional nanomaterials. Student Hosted Colloquia Series, Chemistry Department, Stanford University (March 7, 2016).
  74. 2015

  75. Decoding serotonin neurotransmission. Department of Pharmacology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (December 2, 2015).
  76. How can we know who will benefit from antidepressants? Neuroscience Center, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland (October 26, 2015).
  77. Chemical neurotransmission and functional nano materials. Nanoscience Days Conference, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä Finland (October 22-23, 2015).
  78. How can we know who will benefit from SSRIs? Department of Pharmacology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (October 14, 2015).
  79. Micro- to nanoscale neurotransmitter sensors. Columbia NeuroTechnology Center Kavli Futures Symposium, Columbia University, New York, NY (September 25-26, 2015).
  80. Nanoengineered substrates for nucleic acid biorecognition. 6th International Conference on Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing, China (September 4, 2015).
  81. Nanoengineered substrates for nucleic acid biorecognition. Institute of Functional micro- to nanoscale materials for neurotransmitter sensing, Soochow University, Suzhou, China (August 29, 2015).
  82. Improving in vivo neurotransmitter sensors. 250th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Boston, MA (August 17, 2015).
  83. Micro- to nanoscale neurotransmitter sensors. Micro- and Nanotechnologies Workshop, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (July 30, 2015).
  84. Serotonin encoding of emotionally important information. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (July 29, 2015).
  85. Serotonin in early development: Maternal stress and prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. UCSB Summer Institute in Cognitive Neuroscience: Cognitive Neuroscience of Development, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA (July 1, 2015).
  86. Micro- to nanoscale neurotransmitter sensors. Kavli Futures Symposium, Emerging Technologies for Neuroscience: Building the New Brain Science, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA (June 27-28, 2015).
  87. Serotonin encoding of emotionally important information. 2015 Annual Hatos Center Board Meeting, UUniversity of California, Los Angeles, CA (April 22, 2015).
  88. How can we know who will benefit from antidepressants? 3rd Annual Cell Biology Symposium, California Lutheran University, Thousand Oaks, CA (April 19, 2015).
  89. Enabling biomolecule selection by small molecule-functionalized substrates: A decade of collaborative progress. 249th Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Denver, CO (March 24, 2015).
  90. Decoding serotonin transmission. The Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy, New Orleans, LA (March 8-12, 2015).
  91. Decoding serotonin neurotransmission. Analytical Chemistry Seminar Series, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA (February 19, 2015)
  92. Decoding chemical neurotransmission. Lilly Endowment Analytical Sciences Seminar Series, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN (February, 12, 2015).
  93. 2014

  94. Decoding serotonin transmission. 2nd International Symposium on the Functionality of Organized Nanostructures (FON’14), Tokyo, Japan (November 27, 2014).
  95. Decoding serotonin transmission. Kavli Institute for Brain and Mind, University of California, San Diego, CA (October 21, 2014).
  96. Developing nanoscale measurements for the brain. Science at the Edge Lecture Series ,, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (October 17, 2014).
  97. Predicting antidepressant response. Neuroscience Program, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (October 16, 2014).
  98. Decoding serotonin transmission. University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (October 14, 2014).
  99. Decoding serotonin transmission. Department of Chemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (September 22, 2014).
  100. Why faster is better for serotonin monitoring: An update. 15th International Monitoring Molecules in Neuroscience Conference, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (August 4, 2014).
  101. Serotonin and dopamine release and reuptake by fast microdialysis. 11th International Society for Serotonin Research Meeting, Cape Town, South Africa (July 12, 2014).
  102. Molecular recognition of neurotransmitters to advance in vivo nanobiosensing. 6th International Symposium on Bioanalysis, Biomedical Engineering and Nanotechnology, Hunan University, Changsha, China (May 30, 2014).
  103. Serotonin in depression & anxiety: From translational medicine to a chemical connectome. Center for Addiction Research, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (March 21, 2014).
  104. Chemical brain mapping. El Camino College, Los Angeles, CA (February 28, 2013).
  105. Predicting antidepressant response. Molecular Biology Institute Annual Retreat, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (January 25-26, 2014).
  106. Chemical brain mapping. Department of Chemistry, California State University Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (January 1, 2014).
  107. 2013

  108. Serotonin in depression & anxiety: From translational medicine to a chemical connectome. Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (October 29, 2013).
  109. SERT gene variants: A complex case for involvement in mood disorders and their treatment. Zilkha Neurogenetics Institute, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (September 18, 2013).
  110. Serotonin in depression & anxiety: From translational medicine to a chemical connectome. Chemistry & Biology Interface Day, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (September 5, 2013).
  111. Serotonin in depression & anxiety: From translational medicine to a chemical connectome. Joint Research Institute, Beijing, China (July 1, 2013).
  112. Brain mapping. Three Pillars, One University, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (April 23, 2013)
  113. Toward a chemical connectome. Leonardo Art Science Rendezvous, Speaking Your Mind, UCLA Art | Sci Center, Los Angeles, CA (April 18, 2013)
  114. Brain biosensing: From micro to nano. Florida International University, Miami, FL (February 14, 2013)
  115. 2012

  116. Serotonin in depression & anxiety: From translational medicine to a chemical connectome. 2012 Smalley Institute /Rice Centennial Lecture Series, Rice University, Houston, TX (November 12, 2012).
  117. Serotonin in anxiety and mood: New insights based on biosensing. University of California, Los Angeles Semel Institute Psychiatry Grand Rounds, Los Angeles, CA (October 30, 2012).
  118. The neurochip: A functional nanomaterial for multiplexed biorecognition. California NanoSystems Institute/Taiwan National Program on Nanotechnology Joint Workshop, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (October 3, 2012).
  119. Imaging neurotransmitter-functionalized nanomaterials: Toward nanobiosensing. Monitoring Molecules in Neuroscience, 14th International Conference, London, England (September 19, 2012).
  120. Monitoring serotonin: Why faster is better. Monitoring Molecules in Neuroscience, 14th International Conference, London, England (September 17, 2012).
  121. Serotonin in anxiety and depression: From genetics to nanobiosensing. Jilin University, Changchun, China (June 13, 2012).
  122. Serotonin in anxiety and depression: Genetics and predicting treatment response. Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, China (June 12, 2012).
  123. The neurochip: Functional nanomaterials for multiplexed biorecognition. 5th International Symposium on Bioanalysis, Biomedical Engineering and Nanotechnology (ISBBN 2012), Hunan University, Changsha, China (June 9, 2012).
  124. Brain biosensing: From micro to nano. Biomedical Engineering Program, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (May 17, 2012).
  125. Desperately seeking serotonin: Mood and anxiety disorders and their treatment. Center of Excellence for Neurosciences, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, El Paso, TX (April 23, 2012).
  126. Serotonin transporter function in peripheral blood cells as a predictor of SSRI responsiveness in the treatment of major depressive disorder. Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (April 4, 2012).
  127. Brain biosensing: From micro to nano. Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (April 3, 2012).
  128. 2011

  129. In search of brain biosensors. Indiana University, Department of Chemistry, Bloomington, IL (October 25, 2011).
  130. Multiplexed capture of biological targets. Panel session on Nanobiotechnology & Nanomedicine, ChinaNANO2011 Meeting, Beijing, China (September 7-9, 2011).
  131. Nanoengineered materials for biosensor design. Nanoelectronic Devices for Defense & Security Conference, New York University Polytechnic, Brooklyn NY (August 29-September 1, 2011).
  132. Brain biosensing: From micro to nano. Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (May 9, 2011).
  133. Biomarkers for depression. School of Natural Sciences, University of California, Merced, CA (April 29, 2011).
  134. Brain biosensing: From micro to nano. Department of Chemistry, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (January 19, 2011).
  135. Brain biosensing: From micro to nano. Department of Organic Chemistry, The Weizmann Institute (January 18, 2011).
  136. 2010

  137. Micro- to nanoscales for brain biosensing: Desperately seeking serotonin. School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Brighton, Brighton, UK (September 17, 2010).
  138. Molecular and behavioral influences of the serotonin transporter and its gene variants: Focus on anxiety. Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (August 24, 2010).
  139. In search of brain nanobiosensors: Neurotransmitter nanoarchitectures and biomolecule recognition. Distinguished Lecture: Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (August 23, 2010).
  140. In search of brain nanobiosensors: Neurotransmitter nanoarchitectures and biomolecule recognition. IEEE NANO 2010 – Joint Symposium with NANO Korea 2010, Seoul, Korea (August 19, 2010).
  141. Effects of serotonin transporter deficiency on extracellular serotonin and other neurotransmitters following MDMA and serotonin-related toxicity models. XXVII Congress of the CINP (Collegium Internationale Neuropsychopharmacologicum), Hong Kong (June 9, 2010).
  142. 2009

  143. Serotonin and the misbehaving brain. Department of Chemistry, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden (November 6, 2009).
  144. Moving from micro – to nanoscales for brain biosensing: Small molecule recognition as a critical first step. International Institute for Nanotechnology 2009 Symposium, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (October 29, 2009).­
  145. Molecular ­and behavioral influences of the serotonin transporter and its gene variants, School of Biological Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, China (September 4, 2009).
  146. Brain Probes: From micro to nano. Cross-Disciplinary Scholars in Science and Technology (CSST) Program, California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (August 10, 2009).­
  147. In search of brain nanobiosensors: Small molecule recognition and biomolecule capture as important first steps. Department of Chemistry, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida, Venezuela (May 22, 2009).
  148. In search of brain nanobiosensors: Small molecule recognition and biomolecule capture as critical first steps. 237th ACS National Meeting & Exposition, Salt Lake City, UT (March 22, 2009).
  149. Faster sampling & insights into adaptive responses in serotonin signaling. 60th Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy, Chicago, IL (March 11, 2009).
  150. 2008

  151. In vivo approaches to investigating serotonin neurochemistry: From micro- to nanoscales. Chemistry Colloquium, Lycoming College, Lycoming, PA (October 17, 2008).
  152. Interpreting neurotransmitter release in light of altered baseline levels. 12th International Conference on In Vivo Methods, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (August 13, 2008).
  153. From genes to drugs: SERT-mediated regulation of BDNF, neurogenesis and anxiety. Serotonin Club Meeting, Oxford, England (July 17-19, 2008).
  154. Genetic and environmental predispositions to anxiety: Serotonin transporter and stress. Brain Research Institute, University of California Los Angeles, CA (May 12, 2008).
  155. New agonies over Ecstasy: Serotonin and psychostimulants. 59th Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy, New Orleans, LA (March 6, 2008).
  156. In search of brain nanobiosensors: Small molecule recognition as an important first step. 59th Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy, New Orleans, LA (March 6, 2008).
  157. Frightening complexity of the genetics of anxiety. Genetics Colloquium, Intercollege Program in Genetics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (February 15, 2008).
  158. Serotonin neurochemistry and the origins of anxiety. Department of Chemistry, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (February 4, 2008).
  159. 2007

  160. Serotonin transporter: A genetic predisposition to a lifetime of anxiety. Department of Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (November 26, 2007).
  161. Why I became a scientist! Expanding Your Horizons Conference for 6th-8th grade girls, Women in Science and Engineering Program, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (November 19, 2007).
  162. Influence of serotonin transporter gene variants on uptake and anxiety. Department of Chemistry, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (October 30, 2007).
  163. Genetic predisposition to a lifetime of anxiety: The serotonin transporter and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas, TX (October 8, 2007).
  164. Serotonin neurochemistry and the misbehaving brain. Hanyang University, Seoul, South Korea, June 18, 2007.
  165. In search of brain nanobiosensors: Small molecule recognition as an important first step. 2007 International Conference on Scanning Probe Microscopies, Cantilever-Based Sensors, Nanostructures, Biosensors and Biochips, Jeju Island, South Korea (June 14, 2007).
  166. The neurochip: An advanced nanomaterial for the development of novel biosensors and functionally-directed proteomics. Engineering Conferences International Conference on Nanoscience & Nanotechnology for Biological/Biomedical/Chemical Sensing, Hong Kong (June 6, 2007).
  167. Genetic predisposition to a lifetime of anxiety: The serotonin transporter and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (May 14, 2007).
  168. The neurochip: An advanced nanomaterial for the development of novel biosensors and functionally directed proteomics. 58th Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy, Chicago, IL (February 28, 2007).
  169. Serotonin and the misbehaving brain: Unraveling the biology of anxiety and depression. Pennsylvania State University Lectures on the Frontiers of Science, University Park, PA (February 10, 2007).
  170. Developing nanobiosensors for neurotransmitters: Assembly, patterning and application of optimally diluted biospecific capture surfaces. Mesilla Chemistry Workshop on Electron Transfer and Molecular Devices, Mesilla, NM (February 7, 2007).
  171. 2006

  172. The unusual effects of MDMA and methamphetamine in mice with reduced serotonin transporter expression. Department of Pharmacology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (November 15, 2006).
  173. The serotonin system as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of early Alzheimer’s disease. Department of Pharmacology, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA (October 9, 2006).
  174. The neurochip: An advanced nanomaterial for the development of novel biosensors and functionally-directed proteomics. Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (September 28, 2006).
  175. Nanoscale study of heterogeneous brain architectures: Understanding disease mechanisms and devising novel therapeutics. 23rd National Meeting of the American Chemical Society Meeting, San Francisco, CA (September 10, 2006).
  176. The neurochip: Nanostructured neurotransmitter derivatized surfaces for biosensor development. Department of Chemistry, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA (September 8, 2006).
  177. Serotonin and the aging brain. Department of Neuroscience, Bordeaux 2 University, Bordeaux, France (July 25, 2006).
  178. MDMA-induced serotonin and dopamine release does not stimulate locomotor activity in SERT knockout mice: Importance of 5-HT1B receptors. Monitoring Molecules in Neuroscience, 11th International Conference on In Vivo Methods, Sardinia, Italy (May 21, 2006).
  179. Serotonin uptake measured by chronoamperometry yields new insights into transporter function. National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (February 22, 2006).
  180. The neurochip: Nanostructured neurotransmitter derivatized surfaces for biosensor development. The Houston Society for Engineering in Medicine and Biology Annual Meeting, Houston, TX (February 10, 2006).
  181. 2005

  182. Serotonin and the misbehaving brain. Department of Biochemistry, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland (December 9, 2005).
  183. Serotonin degeneration in Alzheimer’s disease. Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (May 24, 2005).
  184. The neurochip: An advanced nanomaterial for the development of novel biosensors and functionally-directed proteomics. Foundations of Nanoscience Meeting, Snowbird, UT (April 25, 2005).
  185. Neurotransmitter chip for biosensor design and functionally-directed proteomics. Department of Chemistry, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Tokyo, Japan (March 22, 2005).
  186. Serotonin in the aging brain: Can SRI’s be used to delay neurodegeneration? 2005 Analytical Grantee Symposium, Analytical Partnerships: Transforming Concepts into Medicines, Eli Lilly & Company, Indianapolis, IN (February 22, 2005).
  187. Monoamine uptake revisited using carbon fiber microelectrodes and chronoamperometry. 37th Annual Winter Conference on Brain Research, Breckenridge, CO (January 22, 2005).
  188. 2004

  189. Serotonin and the misbehaving brain. Chemistry Department Colloquium, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (November 4, 2004).
  190. The neurochip: An advanced nanomaterial for the development of novel biosensors and functionally-directed proteomics. CrossOver 2004, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (October 21, 2004).
  191. Serotonin degeneration and Alzheimer’s disease. Department of Chemistry, Trinity University, San Antonio, TX (September 30, 2004).
  192. Serotonin and the misbehaving brain. Department of Chemistry, Muhlenberg College, Allentown, PA (May 4, 2004).
  193. Serotonin, reward and drugs of abuse. Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (February 19, 2004).
  194. The effects of reduced serotonin transporter expression on neurotransmission, plasticity and behavior. National Center for Biological Sciences, TATA Institute, Bangalore, India (January 3, 2004).
  195. 2003

  196. The relationship between serotonin and BDNF as trophic factors. 33rd Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, New Orleans, LA (November 11, 2003).
  197. Serotonin and the misbehaving brain: Using analytical chemistry to meet biologic challenges. Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois Urbana Champagne, Urbana, IL (October 24, 2003).
  198. Novel tools for the dynamic analysis of brain chemistry. Midwest Union of Analytical Chemistry Committee Meeting, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN (October, 10, 2003).
  199. SERT as a key regulator of brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression. Monitoring Molecules in Neuroscience: 10th International Conference on In Vivo Methods, Stockholm, Sweden (June 25, 2003).
  200. SERT as a key regulator of serotonergic signaling and the effects on anxiety-related behavior. Monitoring Molecules in Neuroscience: 10th International Conference on In Vivo Methods, Stockholm, Sweden (June 25, 2003).
  201. Serotonin and the fountain of youth: The chemistry of the aging brain. Department of Chemistry, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (April 8, 2003).
  202. Serotonin and the misbehaving brain. Department of Chemistry, St. Joseph’s University, Philadelphia, PA (April 2, 2003).
  203. Electroanalytical methodology elucidates changes in serotonin and dopamine neurotransmission in genetically engineered mouse models of brain disease. 2003 Pittsburgh Conference, Orlando, FL (March 12, 2003).
  204. Serotonin and the misbehaving brain. Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Raleigh-Durham, NC (February 7, 2003).
  205. Serotonin and its reciprocal relationship with BDNF. 35th Annual Winter Conference on Brain Research, Salt Lake City, UT (January 26, 2003).
  206. 2002

  207. Electroanalytical methods elucidate modest but biologically relevant changes in serotonin and dopamine neurotransmission. Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (November 11, 2002).
  208. Is α-synuclein giving us the run around? Department of Neurology, Columbia University Medical School, New York, NY (October 24, 2002).
  209. Serotonin and the misbehaving brain. Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (October 17, 2002).
  210. Measurements in biological systems. Midwest Union of Analytical Chemistry Committee Meeting, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (October, 3, 2002).
  211. Serotonin and the misbehaving brain. Department of Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (September 19, 2002).
  212. Serotonin and the misbehaving brain. Department of Chemistry, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (September 13, 2002).
  213. Serotonin and the misbehaving brain. Department of Chemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (September 12, 2002).
  214. The role of serotonin in MDMA-induced hyperactivity and neurotoxicity. Centers for Disease Control/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV (August 16, 2002).
  215. Measuring serotonin in the study of anxiety. NSF-REU Program, Department of Chemistry, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA (June 27, 2002).
  216. What do neuroscientists do? North Hills Junior High School, Pittsburgh, PA (May 3, 2002).
  217. Deciphering the neurochemistry of anxiety. Department of Chemistry, Olivet Nazarene University, Chicago, IL (April 1, 2002).
  218. What can measuring serotonin in vivo tell us about anxiety? 2002 Pittsburgh Conference, New Orleans, LA (March 20, 2002).
  219. 2001

  220. Using electrochemical techniques to analyze serotonin neurochemistry. Federation of Analytical Chemistry & Spectroscopy Societies, Detroit, MI (October 10, 2001).
  221. Deciphering the neurochemistry of anxiety. Department of Chemistry, Juniata College, Juniata, PA (September 12, 2001).
  222. Deciphering the neurochemistry of anxiety. College of Science Seminar Series, Grand Canyon University, Phoenix, AZ (March 23, 2001).
  223. Deciphering the neurochemistry of anxiety. Department of Chemistry, Carlow College, Pittsburgh, PA (March 16, 2001).
  224. Deciphering the neurochemistry of anxiety. Department of Chemistry, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (March 2, 2001).
  225. Deciphering the neurochemistry of anxiety. Department of Chemistry, Austin Peay University, Clarksville, TN (March 1, 2001).
  226. Deciphering the neurochemistry of anxiety. Central Nervous System Preclinical Research Division, Astra Zeneca, Wilmington, DE (February 15, 2001).
  227. 2000

  228. Deciphering the neurochemistry of anxiety. Division of Neuropathology, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (December 12, 2000).
  229. The neurochemistry of anxiety. Department of Chemistry, Bloomsburg University, Bloomsburg, PA (November 17, 2000).
  230. The neurochemistry of anxiety. Serotonin Club/Brain Research Bulletin Conference, New Orleans, LA (November 3, 2000).
  231. Tools to probe brain chemistry. Pennsylvania State University, Department of Bioengineering, University Park, PA (September 28, 2000).
  232. Criteria for evaluating neurotoxicity: Is 2′-NH2-MPTP a serotonergic neurotoxin? Pennsylvania State University Toxicology Forum, University Park, PA (May 10, 2000).
  233. The heterogeneous nature of the brain: Impact on etiology, diagnosis and treatment of anxiety disorders. SurroMed, Inc., Palo Alto, CA (May 8, 2000).
  234. Tools to study the brain serotonin system: Neurotoxicological approaches. St. Vincent’s College, Department of Chemistry, Latrobe, PA (March 24, 2000).
  235. 1999

  236. Molecular mechanisms underlying adaptation of the presynaptic serotonin system in response to decreased SERT expression: Implications for understanding the etiology and treatment of depression and anxiety. Pennsylvania State University Neuroscience Day, Hershey Medical School, Hershey, PA (May 15, 1999).
  237. 1998

  238. Attempts to unravel differential neurochemistry in serotonin transporter knock-out mice. National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (November 18, 1998).
  239. 1997

  240. 2′-NH2-MPTP selectively lesions serotonin and norepinephrine nerve terminals in three species by a mechanism of action involving oxygen free radicals. National Institute on Drug Abuse Director’s Seminar Series, Baltimore, MD (June 15, 1997).